Monthly Archives: December 2017


Five Interesting Articles

Five Interesting Articles

  Hello everyone! Happy Thursday. I hope you all had wonderful holidays. I certainly did. Today I thought I’d share a few interesting articles that don’t have a clear place in my social media rotation. (I share articles based on a set theme for that day each week.) Here is a New York Times article on the invisible forces that make writing work. It’s always important to consider things like this whether you are the reader, editor, or fellow writer. It’s also just fun to look at writing as a big picture thing, as an […]

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Merry Christmas! (History + Etymology)

Merry Christmas! (History + Etymology)

  (source) Merry Christmas! If you celebrate, as I do, then I wish you a very merry Christmas indeed. Let’s have some history. Christmas, like Halloween, is historically a many-part holiday. It begins with the Advent, which commences on the fourth Sunday before Christmas. This is the time of waiting and preparing for the actual celebration. This is why advent calendars are such a big part of our modern-day celebration. They allow us to count down the days in a more festive way. Then comes Christmas Eve on the 24th of December. Depending on how […]

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Book Review: How English Works by Anne Curzan & Michael Adams

Book Review: How English Works by Anne Curzan & Michael Adams

With The Story of English in 100 Words, David Crystal took us on a tour through the history of our language. Now, with Spell It Out, he takes on the task of answering all the questions about how we spell: “Why is English spelling so difficult?” Or “Why are good spellers so proud of their achievement that when they see a misspelling they condemn the writer as sloppy, lazy, or uneducated?” In thirty-seven short, engaging and informative chapters, Crystal takes readers on a history of English spelling, starting with the Roman missionaries’ sixth century introduction of the Roman alphabet and ending with where the language might be going.

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Merriam-Webster Word of the Year 2017

Merriam-Webster Word of the Year 2017

  Dictionary.com has already chosen their word of the year for 2017, and that word is complicit. I covered that in this post. Most recently, Merriam-Webster has chosen their word of the year, which is feminism. There is a definite political theme going on here with these words. The website gives these definitions: the theory of the political, economic, and social equality of the sexes organized activity on behalf of women’s rights and interests Dictionary.com gives these definitions: the doctrine advocating social, political, and all other rights of women equal to those of men (sometimes initial capital […]

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Comic Monday #2

Comic Monday #2

  Happy Monday! A lot of people don’t like Mondays for some reason. I don’t mind them. I spend a lot of time doing stuff I love, and that includes work and classes, so I’m always happy to get right back to it. Still, I thought it would be fun to start off the week with some fun comics. I absolutely love comic strips. I used to read them every day before we stopped receiving the newspaper. It’s just not quite as fun (or easy) to look them up online every day. But some of […]

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Dictionary.com Word of the Year 2017

Dictionary.com Word of the Year 2017

  For those of you who may not have been aware, Dictionary.com has chosen their word of the year for 2017. The word is complicit. There is no doubt that this year’s word, like many others, was inspired by the political climate of our nation, the United States. The website gives this definition: choosing to be involved in an illegal or questionable act, especially with others; having complicity. Merriam-Webster gives this definition: helping to commit a crime or do wrong in some way   Please read the announcement article here for the full story. I […]

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Book Review: Spell It Out by David Crystal

Book Review: Spell It Out by David Crystal

With The Story of English in 100 Words, David Crystal took us on a tour through the history of our language. Now, with Spell It Out, he takes on the task of answering all the questions about how we spell: “Why is English spelling so difficult?” Or “Why are good spellers so proud of their achievement that when they see a misspelling they condemn the writer as sloppy, lazy, or uneducated?” In thirty-seven short, engaging and informative chapters, Crystal takes readers on a history of English spelling, starting with the Roman missionaries’ sixth century introduction of the Roman alphabet and ending with where the language might be going.

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